Skip to content

What So Many People Don’t Get About the U.S. Working Class [Joan Williams / Harvard Business Review]

November 12, 2016

Read: https://hbr.org/2016/11/what-so-many-people-dont-get-about-the-u-s-working-class

Things that should be obvious to all people, including those devoted to the mainstream Democratic narrative, with the possible exception of cultural islands like some subcultures in NYC or silicon valley. I grew up in NYC (maybe being an immigrant helped), and I can understand that the world can look like this. Once I moved upstate, though – within a year or two, lets say, everything in the article below became visible. The really interesting thing is there is plenty of working class in NYC, but part of being in NYC is having a really efficient “filter” to block out the overwhelming amount of sensory input you get just walking down the street… So even though you have a stockbroker sitting next to a janitor on the subway in the morning, they will not only never talk to each other, they will be self-trained to be physically incapable of even overhearing each others’ conversations, even if their bodies are literally touching. It’s hard to describe the subtle and insidious power of this unless you’ve transitioned in and out of it. And to be fair, people who’ve lived their whole lives in the less well-connected parts around here suffer from plenty of misconceptions of their own…

An important point for me: The Working Class = Middle Class. I always saw Working Class as a euphemism.

[via LeisureGuy]

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: